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Asia eats, korea eats

beijing day 4: (not really)

On my last day of Beijing (July 12, last monday), I didn’t really do anything except check out of the hotel and catch the flight back to Incheon. Exciting, I know. But we got some pretty cups at the Shanghai Expo 2010 store in the Beijing airport.

shanghai market, chinese woman, dimsum platter, and wheelbarrow

After resting when we got back to my grandparents apartment, my uncle treated everyone to dinner at a Japanese-Korean fusion sushi restaurant. Everything was delicious, high-quality seafood, and I was absolutely stuffed by the end of the night.

Here are the dishes that we ate in the order that they came out:

sauces that were eaten with almost every dish: dwengjang and garlic, gochujang, and soy sauce

abalone jook: good flavor - it was seasoned just enough so that it's savory and delicious

mixed rice sushi, with some kind of whitefish on top

3 different types of sashimi, served with radish sprouts on a frozen slab of rock

to be eaten in a ssam with ggehneep, radish, onions, rinsed kimchi, and dwenjang

various raw mollusks: abalone, sea squirts, sea cucumbers, etc.: strange textures, but briny flavors

live shrimp, deheaded and fed to you on the spot. they wriggled in my mouth, but they were succulentl and sweet

boiled octopus served with a vinegary sauce: tender and sweet, but still with a slight chew

semi-frozen toro, to be eaten with nori and sesame oil. this was so good - i didn't know that fish could have marbling until that night

clam meeyukgook: a humble side to an extravagant meal

partially dried mackerel (it's like fish jerky), wrapped in nori and eaten with chilis, garlic, scallion, and seaweed

grilled shrimp heads and whole shrimp

reusing the remains of the wriggling-shrimp dish. thats where all the shrimpy flavors at!

a local fish cut into steaks and glazed with a teriyaki-ish sauce

spicy stew made from a really, really tender fish, served with mixed rice

Because meat is really expensive in Korea, the protein of choice is usually fish, although tofu and chicken are also often eaten. So as you can see, I’ve been absolutely stuffing myself with sashimi. As good as all this food is, it was almost a relief  to eat samgaetang (i.e. a chicken stuffed with rice, jujubes, chestnut, and ginseng made into a hotpot) today. BUUUTT unfortunately I don’t have any pictures for you guys – I brought my camera out to the restaurant, but I forgot my battery in the charger -o-;

Ah, well always next time. I’m off to the sauna, see you guys next time!

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