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Making Spicy Hand-Torn “Noodles” with Mommy

WHEEEE! I’m back! And so soon after the last post too :) Aren’t you proud?

This week is finals week, but I’m braving the stress of exams and papers for you guys! (Read: PROCRASTINATING TO THE NTH DEGREE).

Ahem. Anyways. This is a post I’ve been wanting to share for a looong time – over a month. And now that I finally (kinda) have time to, I’m super excited for it. Ready???

Get ready for… SUJEBI!!!

Soo-jay-whaaa?

Sujebi! Pronounced soo-jeh-bee or 수재비, these are hand-torn noodles made from a flour-based dough. Like most Korean soups/stews, they’re usually served in an anchovy stock with a bunch of other vegetables and proteins (usually different types of seafood – to go along with the stock, y’know?). You can read more about a classic sujebi I had in Korea here.

But this time around, it’s a whole ‘nuther ball game, because the sujebi on this post is HOME-MADE.

Yeah, you read that right.

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Of course, you start by making the stock – the base, heart, and soul of all soups delicious and tummy-warming.

The basic anchovy-stock consists of water, onion, turnip, dried shiitake mushrooms, dried anchovies, and kombu.

Once everything has boiled together, you remove everything, and skim off the foam, it’ll look like this:

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savory, clear, anchovy broth - a blank canvas for all kinds of ingredients!

While everything was bubbling together, my mom got the sujebi dough ready:

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I’m not positive about the ratios of the ingredients, but I think the dough is a mix of flour, water, and baking soda/powder. MAYBE. I’ll get back to you on that. But you have to knead it A LOT.

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A LOT, a lot.

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pooooke.

Until it kinda reaches that kind of texture.

And if you’re awesome at multi-tasking as my mom is, you’ll have loaded up the stock with some of the slower-cooking veggies while kneading.

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onions & carrots

After cooking those for a bit, my mom added the SECRET INGREDIENT.

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What looks like an ugly pile of reddish-brown goo is actually one of the basic building blocks to Korean cuisine. It’s gochujang, (고추장), a fermented red chili paste that’s savory, spicy, and sweet all at once. You can find commercial ones at the store, but this is a special one made by grandmother, using high-quality sun-dried red peppers and aged in her apartment. My mom takes it out for special occasions :O

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My mom added the gochujang to pot, turning it a deep, orangey color. Once that got boiling, we were ready to..

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ADD THE DOUGH! This is the “hand-torn” part of the dish. We let the dough rest for a bit, and then started ripping bits off of the huge chunk. You stretch them pretty thin, but not so thin that a hole rips in them.

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Then you add it to the broth to cook! Of course, each piece will be a different size, and some parts will be thinner or thicker than others. But that’s the fun of it!

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streeeetch

After plopping in the dough, we added the faster-cooking vegetables..

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+ mushrooms and zucchini

… and brought the entire thing to a boil, to make sure everything was cooked.

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it looks like mozzarella... but I swear it's not!

After cooking it for a few minutes, and adding super-thin veggies like scallions and sprouts,  it looked like this:

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WHICH MEAN IT WAS READYYY!

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By now, everything has softened and melded together, absorbing all the delicious flavors of the different veggies and the gochujang.

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The color is kind of misleading, because it really wasn’t as spicy as it looks. There was a bit of a kick to it, but the gochujang gives it more of a depth and complexity than heat.

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The flour from the sujebi also helps thicken up the soup a little bit, so it’s got some body.

And see how each piece is different?

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all unique in their own way :)

It’s an adventure eating each piece – there’s a different level of chewiness with each bite!

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varying thickness

You can probably tell it was ABSOLUTELY AMAZINGLY DELICIOUS just by looking at the pictures, but in case you want further proof…

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Oh yes. I demolished it. Ate every last bite. And don’t worry, I finished the soup too :D

That was a goooood meal. And now that I’ve finished writing this up, I’m hungry. With no mom-made food in sight. Noooooo….

BUT IT’S OK, BECAUSE I’ll BE HOME IN A WEEK AND A HALF. Finals, you are going DOWN.

Good luck everyone – WE CAN DOOOO THISS!!!

P.S. Happy belated Mother’s Day! 엄마, you’re the most amazing person I know – just looking at your food makes me miss you so much. I can’t wait to see you in 2 weeks! 화이팅!

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Discussion

2 thoughts on “Making Spicy Hand-Torn “Noodles” with Mommy

  1. i’m tan.

    Posted by Calynn | May 9, 2011, 5:40 pm
  2. EUNICE. You’re adorable, and this must have made your mom so incredibly happy! “All unique in their own way” made me laugh. Why must I be gluten free! We will experiment with this and other such food items in the future hopefully! :)

    Posted by Stephanie | May 10, 2011, 9:47 pm

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